Bones on the Road

Marcus Pettiford

For my practicum, I was given the opportunity to work with Dr. Gooding on public outreach and the expansion of Forensic Anthropology within community schools. My overall goal was to create a Forensic Anthropology Traveling Trunk designed to teach grades K-5. While the thought of this creation may have sounded it easy, it was rather challenging creating each activity based on the State of Georgia’s standards.  My goals were easily accomplished by working with teachers from different schools when it came to designing my Traveling Trunk. With the help of public educators, I wanted to create activities that would promote forensic anthropology but also in a fun way that students would be interested in participating.

Throughout the semester, I was also taking Lab in Forensic Anthropology which helped guided me when it came to preparing my activities.  My finished product was a mobile traveling case that public educators can use to teach students about Forensic Anthropology. The trunk consisted of four different activities, Sex estimation, Human vs. Animal Identification, Trauma Analysis, and Long Bones Identification. Lastly, if given the opportunity I would like to expand more on my research and see how other public educators and students across America enjoy the use of Traveling Trunks.

Zooarchaeology on Display

Christie Eades

This semester I had to opportunity to create a comparative collection of animal bones for Investigators and students to study. This involved collecting animals remains and processing them to be able to see the anatomical and morphological differences between human bone and non-human. Another aspect of the project was collecting animal bones from local butcher shops to show what domesticated animal bones look like compared to other native wildlife species.

During the Spring of 2019 over 700 animal bones were analyzed, collected and cataloged. I created an Excel spreadsheet of the species of animals I collected along with number of bones and type. Animal bones in the collection featured: American Black Bear, Armadillo, Beaver, Bobcat, Cougar, Cow Coyote, Domestic Cat, Domestic Dog, domestic Ferret, Domestic Pig, Eastern Cottontail Rabbit, Easter Gray Squirrel, Grey, Fox, Horse, Raccoon, Red Wolf, Striped Skunk, Virginia Opossum, White Tailed Deer, and Wild Juvenile Boar.

Another aspect of the project was creating a display case of animal skulls to show the differences between cranial and dental features along with how it changes along species.  Finally, I took photos of comparing the morphological differences of the animals listed above compared to human. The photos were compiled into a manual that compared each bone to human. The manual can be used in the field or even classroom setting to identify animal vs. human bone.

KSU Anthro Goes to the Georgia Academy of Science

March, 2019- KSU Anthropology gave five presentations this year at the annual Georgia Academy of Science meeting at the University of North Georgia, Gainesville. This conference is a great opportunity for students to present their research in a low-stress environment. Students can also submit manuscripts for publication to the Georgia Journal of Science. This is a fantastic way to build your CV and get started on your academic journey. Congratulations to all!

EVALUATION OF MISSISSIPPIAN PERIOD HUNTING PRACTICES IN GEORGIA**, Bryant C. Long*

PATTERNS OF SWIFT CREEK INTERACTION IN THE CHATTAHOOCHEE RIVER VALLEY, Gary Owenby*

ENERGY EXPENDITURE ACROSS THE ETOWAH CHEIFDOM: TESTING A HUMAN MODEL AGAINST ESTABLISHED ALGORITHMS**, Alice F. Gooding, Joseph Eleam*, and Patrick Wilborn*

TESTING ANCESTRAL HOMOGENEITY OF ANATOMICAL TEACHING CRANIA**, Christopher M. Goden, Alice F. Gooding

ENGAGING WITH THE PUBLIC: AN EXAMINATION OF AN ANTHROPOLOGY OUTREACH PROGRAM, Hannah D. Bauguess*

End of Anthropology section presentations on Saturday- what a great group!
KSU Anthro student Hannah gave a strong presentation about her efforts to engage Atlanta area communities with anthropology.
KSU Anthro senior, Chris, won the award for Best Undergraduate Anthropology Paper!

A Sweet Tooth for Dental Anthropology

Ashleigh Freeman

For my last semester, I chose to do a practicum with Dr. Gooding. I was lucky enough to get a practicum that was aligned with research I had done previously in an osteology field school in Greece and that I found interesting. My overall goal was to create a collection of teeth that can be used to teach various classes in the department. Also, I wanted to create a couple of extra sets for Dr. Smith to take with her to Greece. For classes like the Human Skeleton and Lab in Physical Anthropology, having hands-on access to teeth can help students gain a deeper understanding of the importance of teeth.

I worked throughout the semester, learning as much as I could about human dentition through books and articles. I then used that knowledge to create collections of wear patterns in each type of teeth. I created displays of show teeth (which is the perfect example of that tooth) and funky teeth (which contained caries, fillings, and grills). Writing the final paper at the end of the project shows how much you learn over the semester, conferring a sense of expertise in that area of anthropology. After sorting through approximately 1,700 teeth, I had all the sets ready, so I built little displays for the classroom. I hope my practicum can help someone down the road feel more confident when they learn about teeth!

Project Chimps, Morgantown, GA

Taylor Dockery

My internship at Project Chimps changed my entire perspective on what I could pursue with a career in anthropology. I am highly interested in biological anthropology and fully intend to obtain my Masters in biological anthropology, but when it came to choosing an internship, I wanted to step outside of my comfort zone and try something new. Fortunately for me, working as a chimpanzee caregiver at Project Chimps was the once in a lifetime internship that I was lucky enough to experience. As an intern, I was assigned to an experienced chimpanzee caregiver, who was my mentor and taught me everything I needed to know in terms of chimp behavior and safety. Each day, I would arrive at the sanctuary at 8 a.m. and the chimps would be waiting in the ‘villa’ (housing area for the chimps) for us to begin our daily routine of feeding them and cleaning their bedroom area and porches, which required extensive scrubbing daily.

Spending time with the chimps in the afternoon after the day’s final rush truly kept me on my toes because their interactions, from an anthropological perspective, are very similar to our human interactions. Meal time, in particular, allowed my interpretive mind to see the complex social interactions at play and understand chimpanzee social hierarchy. I began to see that some chimps never had their food stolen but other chimps, always had their food stolen because they were little.

Apart from beginning to understand the complexity of chimp social relationships and actions, I found myself beginning to see the characters of each chimp come through the more time I spent with them. Within three days of working at the sanctuary, I knew the names and faces of all 11 chimps that were housed in my ‘villa’. A couple of weeks in, I began to fall in love and truly know each chimp on a personal level. Before I knew it, I found myself remembering that this one absolutely loves peaches or that another one would soon steal my heart and always want me to blow bubbles for him (as can be seen in the photo). Ultimately, the internship required hard work, lots of sweat and dedication, but mostly it required love and the desire to make a change. Helping better the lives of these retired medical research chimpanzees was the first and foremost reason I chose the sanctuary as my internship, but the chimps ultimately ended up giving me so much more than I ever could have offered them. I truly do not believe I could have picked a more wonderful facility and group of people to intern with because they gave me more than I had ever expected. It took no time at all for me to realize that anthropology has so many more doors to open than I knew that it could, and I am excited for a lifetime of being able to pursue so many wonderful career paths thanks to anthropology. Who knows… the next time you see me I might just be the next Jane Goodall.