Remote Internship Connects Art History and Anthropology

Shafaa Lang

This image is of a Siberian kitchen . The demon faces throughout the images are intriguing. Shamanism is a common practice amongst indigenous in Siberia which makes me wonder if the demon dragon faces are affiliated with Shamanism.

When I started college back in 2012, my major was Art History, but I ended dropping out due to some issues in school. In 2016, I started to go to community college and took up Liberal Arts. During my time in community college, I picked up a book called “Everyone is African” by Daniel J. Fairbanks and it was then that I fell in love with the study of Anthropology. After that I started reading different books like “Living Color: The Biological and Social Meaning of Skin Color” by Nina Jablonski and “Gun, Germs, and Steel” by Jared Diamond which really inspired me to study Anthropology. Anthropology was the prefect way to combine my love for History and Science.

This image is of an indigenous Siberian person, more than likely painted by someone non-indigenous.

 Before actively looking for an internship, I did not think that it would be hard to find one. Little did I know, it required more work than I thought. I got in contact with several different organizations and not one responded back to me. It is my belief that it was due to things being shut down because of the pandemic. This was very discouraging, but Dr. Gooding presented us with a remote opportunity called Endangerred Archives Programme which made things a whole lot easier.  Endangerred Archives Programme supports the preservation of cultural archives from different regions throughout the world. Their goal is to digitize these archives while keeping the original copy in its country of origin. I was very intrigued because I never knew that you could do Anthropology work from home right from your computer and with having a father who is disabled it would allow me to cut my time away from home because I also work a full-time job.

This is a typical workday. I am working on identifying appropriate keywords for an image. 

During this internship, I learned so much! I believe that this will strengthen my resume. It also shows that I have familiarity with archival work which could be good when applying to work at museums.  My Research Methods and Cultural Anthropology classes during my time at KSU gave me the knowledge necessary to make it through this internship, especially Research Methods with Dr. Lundy. Learning about different research methods and how to collect data is important in ethnographic research or fieldwork.

A picture of indigenous men of Siberia.  

The internship taught me patience and it has even taught me how to stay focused without having a boss looking directly over what I do.  If I could change anything, it would be the timing. I do not have the support from my parents which makes it hard to do an internship because I must work full-time to live. Having a job and doing an internship was ridiculously hard for me to balance, but overall, I enjoyed the experience!

  My internship was to help make it easier for people to find images of 19th and 20th century Southern Siberia indigenous peoples by giving each image keywords which is like an identification marker.  These images are digitized archives. The original archives are safe in the region origin that they came from.  In my work, I had to do my own research about the culture to be able to put keywords that made sense. What this internship taught me is that Siberia has a deep history and that the people there find it especially important to preserve their cultural heritage. Similar to the Americas, outsiders did come in and take over, this led to a fight for cultural preservation for the Siberian people.  Learning about the culture made me really want to travel to Siberia. This internship has also inspired me to pursue a future career in Cultural Anthropology and I look forward to applying what I have learned here at KSU. I would love to travel and live amongst different groups of people to study their culture. I strongly believe that travelling and learning about different cultures around the world can help you find yourself.

Digital Internship During the Covid-19 Pandemic

Adrienne Goodwyn

Coming into this internship I was a little scared. This was happening during Covid-19 and I was worried about if I was going to be able to get an internship. It was one of the last things I needed to graduate in the fall, so I was very stressed out about if I would be able to find one or not.

Around June of 2020 I received an email for a digital internship categorizing Siberian photographs on a website called Zooniverse. This website works with countries who have a hard time keeping their documents, pictures, etc. protected. Zooniverse also works with the Endangered Archives program, which the countries get in contact with before their documents show up on the Zooniverse website. When I got the email, I was very excited. I was glad that not only would I be able to work safe from home, but I would also be able to set my own schedule. This also worked well for me because during the fall I had three other classes as well, so having to ride out to an internship site, commute to school/do my school work, and work at my part-time job would have been difficult to juggle. This internship was the best outcome for me.

During the start of my internship I realized how easy it would be to get distracted. I live with my family and partner, so there were many opportunities to get distracted. However, even with those distractions I made myself concentrate, so I could put 100% of my time into these pictures. Even though I was one of around 100 volunteers, I still wanted to put effort into my work. This was something the people in Siberia did not have the time or resources to do themselves, so I knew my work was going to be helpful. In September I ran into a problem. I started getting pictures I had already categorized. I would have to constantly refresh the page, to try and make a new picture some up. After almost a week of this problem I asked my advisor if I could change Zooniverse projects. There were many others that needed volunteers, so I thought a switch would still be helpful. After I got the okay, I started on a project called Fossil Atmospheres, where I had to mark stomatal cells in plant cells. Both of these projects felt rewarding to me. I realized this archiving is fun and interesting even if it is tedious to do.

I believe the classes I took during the Spring semester of 2020 helped me with this internship the most. When writing my theme papers, I was able to draw on techniques from my Research Methods class, as well as my Human Origins class to help me with my research. After college I would like to work at a museum or even the Botanical Gardens, and I think the work I did in my internship will build the way towards those jobs. This was a rewarding experience for me and I am glad, that even in the midst of Covid, I was able to receive my Zooniverse internship.

Intern at Edwards-Pitman Environmental Inc.

Claire Carden

First coming to college and learning about everything I would have to do along the way was pretty daunting. I went into school not knowing what to expect from an internship, let alone an internship in Anthropology or Archaeology. When I was presented with the option to either participate in a practicum or an internship, I had to do my research to figure out which would work better for me. Both would provide me with the chance to learn more and grow in my field, but ultimately, I decided an internship would give me the best chance possible to build connections outside of academia. I think what had helped me decide was the words of my professors over the years. It is important to have a minimum of three professors you who know and trust, and are in contact with, that can be included in your resume as references and who can help you when you are looking for either a practicum or an internship. I had heard one of my professors, Dr. Powis, talk pretty often about careers in Cultural Resource Management, but I wasn’t sure how to go about looking into internships for that field. I reached out to Dr. Powis soon after and he gave me all the tips he could about getting started in CRM and even helped me get into contact with Edwards-Pitman, the company I would later intern for. Without his help I may not have ended up where I am right now, and I am absolutely thankful to him for all his help getting started. When I initially decided I wanted to intern with Edwards-Pitman, I reached out, but the pandemic had just begun to impact school and work so in the end, I had to wait a full semester to intern with them because of the pandemic. But I remained at the top of their list for potential interns by staying in contact and letting them know that I was still interested in interning the following semester. When the time came, I emailed my contact again to make another pitch for myself and I finally landed an interview and a few weeks later I was the newest Edwards-Pitman archaeology intern.

Edwards-Pitman is an environmental company that carries out archaeological surveys and excavations as part of their long list of services for their clients. As an intern in their archaeology department, I was able to assist with and participate in some of the many projects and surveys that come through. No project is the same as the next, but some can definitely be similar to others. Many of the survey projects are limited to Phase I and Phase II, which includes shovel tests, soil assessment, and a lot of walking around in different environments. Some survey areas can be in heavily developed urban or suburban areas and are easy to traverse, but others can be wooded areas and hillsides. There are certainly more difficult surveys, for example there was a survey that some of the field techs that I worked with were preparing for that was going to be completely in swampland and would mean the techs needed to update a lot of their gear and shoes to work with that environment. With CRM, you need to be prepared for any kind of environment, weather, and wildlife encounters (especially snakes). When working in the field, you should always bring more water than you expect to need, snacks, bug-spray, sunscreen, and a hat. It’s also smart to have everything you need in a backpack that you can bring with you around the survey area. Every trip out to a project location involves reviewing the provided map, splitting up the work for the team, and setting up your field notebook for the specific project being worked on that day. Field notes include the transect and shovel test number, the depth of the shovel test, the different soil layers per depth, and a general description of the vegetation and the surrounding environment for every shovel test. As long as you include all of that information in legible handwriting and in a way that is organized and easy to understand, that is really all that matters. When you go out in the field, you will be teamed up with other field techs, and getting paired with the right team can easily keep spirits high and can make the whole day more enjoyable for everyone.

            Working in the lab, I was able to participate in several different aspects of the job. Much of my time was spent labeling photos and labeling artifact bags, but I also had the chance to wash new artifacts and sort the bag tags for different projects. A lot of the work was tedious and time consuming, but I learned quickly that bringing some headphones and listening to music or a podcast made the time pass much quicker. Labeling photos requires small and steady handwriting that can still be easily read, and because the ink from the pen takes some time to dry it definitely requires patience. At the end of every day, whether I started in the field and ended in the lab or spent the whole day in the lab, I always felt accomplished having finished labeling bags and just one project’s worth of photos (which could be anywhere from 50 to 250 photos). One of the best things about completing lab work is seeing the progress I’ve made since the start of the day laid out in front of me and seeing the table slowly become clearer as the day goes on. Being an intern in the lab gave me more opportunities to interact with the different employees at Edwards-Pitman outside of the archaeology department, but I found that I tended to enjoy working in the field with the other field techs more than sitting at a table all day. The amount of field work compared to the amount of lab work that I completed over the course of my time at Edwards-Pitman was really evenly divided, but there were weeks at a time where the only work available was in the lab meaning I had no time in the field. With the pandemic, many of the bigger projects that had more funding attached were cut down and thus allowed fewer people to work on them. This is unfortunately the case for many of the newer projects for Edwards-Pitman and this made my work only slightly more difficult to accomplish. I quickly noticed that everyone at the company is so warm and welcoming to not just interns but new employees as well, which was wonderful to see as someone who maintains an interest in continuing in the CRM field.

CRM fits into Anthropology under the subfield of Archaeology. It is generally described as the practice of surveying and conserving cultural resources, which can be anything from physical artifacts to full sites within a survey area. Many of the first anthropology courses that I took at KSU were archaeology related, so I learned pretty early into my major about CRM and the work that it involves. However, learning about CRM and participating in CRM are very different things. Being able to go out in the field and figure out for yourself what the work is and what kind of cultural resources are out there is an experience I think any student of anthropology should have. Anthropology is the study of humans and human cultures, each of the subfields covers a different area of study, but everything comes down to human beings. CRM is no different in that every interaction, be it with a client or with the environment, deals with humans and their effect on the past and present. My time at Edwards-Pitman definitely opened my eyes to the different aspects of CRM and archaeology and helped me to build a better understanding of how anthropology can fit into my own daily life. Any anthropology internship like one at Edwards-Pitman can help a student to gain a more in-depth awareness of why anthropology is so important in today’s world and will also allow them to help others in their lives to understand what it is that makes the work so interesting. Personally, being able to explain what I have spent my semester working on to my friends and family has been rewarding, especially seeing the realization of “oh that’s actually really cool” spread across their faces. It has been a genuine pleasure to be able to work with Edwards-Pitman and to meet all the wonderful people who work there.

Hidden History: A Library of Congress Virtual Internship

Adrianna Dunn

I started this year with a complete plan leading to my graduation. My practicum requirements were going to be fulfilled this Summer 2020.  I was accepted to be a Research Assistant for Dr. Smith’s Greek Osteology Research Project. But four weeks in Greece turned to eight weeks at home in Connecticut with the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic.

As the research trip was cancelled and more internships became unavailable, I was unsure as to if I would be able to meet my graduation goal. Luckily, I received an email from Dr. Gooding that contained a virtual internship opportunity that I could complete from home. The internship would be volunteering to transcribe online materials for the institution of my choice. I chose to be a Library of Congress volunteer. Virtually transcribing materials was not how I had expected my internship to be. I had expected my internship to be more hands-on and interacting with multiple people. Though it was not what I had expected, I was glad that I would still be able to graduate when I planned.

To volunteer for the Library of Congress, began with creating a personal account in By the People. By the People is the application by which volunteers can keep track of the materials they transcribe and review. Transcription was needed so that the materials could be preserved and available for search engines and the public. Before I could register for the internship, I had to show that I would be able to complete the work required. I transcribed one of the documents and submitted proof that it was accepted. That was the beginning of my virtual internship.

By the People transcribing portal.

The materials were in different campaigns that the Library of Congress posted. Materials included handwritten and typed papers, legal documents, letters, and even diary entries. Some documents were even from people during the Revolutionary War. Most of my work was self-guided. The Library of Congress provided a How to Transcribe guide, but other than that I was mostly on my own. It was different from other types of internships, as I mostly supervised myself.

I was able to set what times I would transcribe, and review, and I was able to fit time in with my other summer classes. The internship requirement of 150 hours was still in place, so I had to be on top of the time that I needed to work. I was able to break my time up into shifts. Though most of the material was interesting, such as, the drafts of Mary Church Terrell, an African American and Women’s rights activist, it could become tedious to be sitting and transcribing for five hours a day.

Mary Church Terrell paper circa 1897.

Breaking up the time I worked and taking breaks helped me stay focused and not feel as though it was dull. Transcribing every day for eight weeks can definitely feel tiresome. There were some days that I dreaded going back to the computer and looking at more papers. I had to be extremely dedicated and manage my time well.

Over the coming weeks I became better at transcribing and understanding different styles of writing and script. There were stories of different interactions that were enjoyable to read. Creativity was needed to complete the required internship assignments and papers. Since this was a virtual internship, I had to find ways that it could apply to anthropology and what I was learning from it.

I gained access to stories that are not often available in history books or websites. In addition, I could read individuals’ personal writings and thoughts that provided a more complete view of the culture and ideas of that time. Working as a virtual volunteer, I was able to provide completed materials for future research purposes and community access. I gained a better understanding of how historical materials are preserved. It was an interesting look into archival work and public institutions.

Boston newspaper circa 1833-1916.

By completing this virtual internship, I became better at analyzing and connecting materials to anthropology. I was able to learn methods for transcribing and I can now list transcribing as a skill on my resume. I was able to gain better time management and complete the hours at my own pace.  I gained experience with transcribing and found out that I do not want to focus on similar work in the future. I learned more about my work preferences and that I want to work in an environment with opportunities to be active and have more hands-on projects.

There are many benefits to transcribing for the Library of Congress. The ability to set a schedule is great for anyone that has other responsibilities or classes. Transcribing is also a transferable skill and is a notable contribution to a resume or CV. Access to historical materials can enhance cultural understanding and give context to past stories, as well as be more readily available for the public and community use. Though the work can be tedious at times, volunteering virtually is a great option for anyone looking for an internship that they can complete at home.

Deep Roots in Georgia: The Root House Museum

Sara Allen

I was an unpaid intern at the Root House Museum. My time there started in August, while the house was still dressed for summer. The first month at the Root House, I was given a docent manual and became acquainted with everyone that worked there at the time. I was given a lot of freedom with my time spent there. The executive director allowed me to choose what I spend my time doing as an intern at the Root House. I was provided access to resources that the museum already had, and then the rest of time was independent research. The atmosphere at the museum is very easy-going; help with projects was always requested and never pressed.

I think this the benefit that comes from working with a museum that relies somewhat heavily on volunteer work- the executive director and program coordinator avoid asking too much from their unpaid workers. Although I requested not to lead museum tours, I sat in during some of them to learn more about what a docent has to do as well as the typical visitors to the Root House Museum. Most of the visitors that I saw while I was there were either retirees or school aged children.

Aside from research and giving tours, a lot of the work at the museum involves arranging furniture and prepping for events. The room exhibits change almost every month, so furniture and décor have to be carefully moved around and arranged. The museum will host events, usually as an avenue to raise more money, and this also involves arranging tables and decorations in the garden. Otherwise, if you’re on the clock you might be asked to help sweep and dust. The Root House Museum is a good place for potential interns that want quiet, self-driven work. The other draw of the Root House is that the exhibits there touch a broad amount of subjects. The museum represents history, local history, business in 1800’s, the middle class during the 1800’s, horticulture and pharmacy, race, religion and gender. There are a lot of opportunities at the Root House for deeper studies into any of these subjects and more. The Root House Museum has connections to other local historians, other museums, and other historical societies. This museum is actually a very good place for people looking to make connections with other historical museums. It’s also a good place to learn how smaller scale museums maintain their exhibits, and turn out a profit.

The drawbacks of the museum start with the fact that internships will be unpaid. People who want more direction in their work, especially people who need consistent feedback, may not find the Root House as relaxing as I did. The days spent at the Root House are very slow, and some people need an environment where they constantly have something do and this just isn’t an environment that will keep anyone on their toes. Also research projects involve dead ends and this can be potentially frustrating for some people.

Grounded in History: Museum of History and Holocaust Education

Rebecca Ruggles

For my last fall semester at KSU, I interned at the Museum of History and Holocaust Education right here at the university. I worked with their curator Adina Langer researching and helping with upcoming projects for the museum. There I learned how much effort went into each exhibit that was on display within the museum.  Working at the museum proved to be a very fast paced and on the go environment especially when October rolled around, as that was when field trips from school would be scheduled to visit for tours. There were quite a few tours going on every week and the museum staff would often be out of the office visiting school with traveling trunks or mobile exhibits.

 I also helped with giving tours, but as a support role. I aided the docent giving the tour and assisting children with their work. I also transcribed an interview that was part of the ongoing project at the Museum of History and Holocaust Education called the Legacy Series Oral History Program. I was also working on setting up exhibits by researching information, helping create panels, and setting up display cases which .  I also tried to participate in many of the events they had going on such as their docent training, where they trained volunteers to be docents, and home school day, where children who are home schooled are visiting.

This was an amazing experience that I would recommend for others to do if they have the opportunity. I felt that working at the museum helped hone my research skills and let me see how I could potentially apply them in a workplace. I also learned a lot about the dynamics of a work environment for a museum and what it takes to be successful. Everyone I worked with was very nice and very knowledgeable in their work. If you decide to work here do try to interact with everyone, don’t be afraid to ask questions, and participate in events!

A Deep Dive Into the Past at Bulloch Hall

Molly Dangar

This summer I interned at Bulloch Hall in Roswell, GA. The site is located near the Roswell Mill, and was the childhood home of Mittie Bulloch, the mother of former president Theodore Roosevelt. The site showcases the Bulloch home as well as a garden, slave quarters, privy, carriage house, and two wells. Visitors can explore the grounds and learn about Roswell, GA, The Bulloch family, Theodore Roosevelt, and the way of life in the 1830’s.

Gwen Koehler, the Director of Education at Bulloch Hall, along with her coauthor Connie H., have published three books containing letters that the Bulloch family exchanged during the 19th century.  The books contain letters telling the story of the love affair between Mittie Bulloch and President Theodore Roosevelt Senior leading up to their wedding, the civil war, the couple’s move to Thee’s hometown in New York along with Mittie’s mother, and the hardships that the family faced during this time. These three books include letters between 1854 and 1864. For my internship I read, analyzed, transcribed, and digitized letters that were written between 1865 and 1869.  My college experience has involved printed textbooks and academic articles written by scholars, so it has been an interesting experience working with handwritten letters. Not to mention these letters are written in cursive with a fountain pen and inkwell, which now seems to be a lost art. After all of the letters are transcribed, Gwen and her coauthor Connie M. Huddleston will start the editing process and publish a fourth book containing letters written post 1965. In addition to transcribing letters, I had the opportunity to meet many docents (volunteers) at Bulloch Hall as well as some of the members of the different guilds that meet on the site such as the Gardeners Guild. During the middle of July Bulloch Hall hosts Camp Rough Riders, which is a day camp for kids ages 6-10 to come learn about the Bulloch and Roosevelt families, and do crafts relating to the time period.

I thoroughly enjoyed my time at Bulloch Hall and wish that I could do it all over again. Being a student that is mostly interested in physical anthropology, I wasn’t sure what to expect while interning at a place that was more historically and culturally focused, but it was one of the best opportunities I have ever had. The ladies that work in the administrative office at Bulloch Hall rave about Kennesaw Students, and really know how to make you feel welcome. I did not feel like an intern while working at Bulloch Hall, I felt like family.