Building a Literature Bank in Forensic Anthropology Builds Team-Based Skills for Graduate School

Lauren Mitchell, Annaleise Schneider, and Caitlin Hobbs

While the summer semester came with additional challenges because of the coronavirus, these challenges did not put a damper on academic curiosity and endeavors. Throughout the summer I had the opportunity to take a directed applied research course with Dr. Gooding. Through this course I was able to establish a deeper appreciation for the research process. I conducted literature searches and paraphrased research studies and books. Additionally, I learned new methods behind age estimation techniques in forensic anthropology using various skeletal markers. All the while, care was taken to ensure that academic rigor was on par with what we as students would experience in person. Dr. Gooding had online team meetings with us every few weeks to discuss our progress and was always available on our team chat. I also worked on an outreach project for the anthropology open house in order to introduce students to opportunities in biological anthropology within the department. All in all, I learned many valuable new skills with my experience as a research assistant with Dr. Gooding for the summer. From gathering information to aid in the research process and collecting information to synthesizing the information from the source articles concisely. These things will be valuable for my future in graduate school. – Mitchell

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, our group research work was shifted to a virtual classroom. While a virtual classroom might seem like a difficult place to conduct group research, our group found we were able to communicate and cooperate from a distance, both effectively and efficiently. Our group conducted meetings intermittently via MS teams, allowing us to chat and collaborate on our research while also providing the unique opportunity to get to know each other and meet one another’s pets. We gained experience in graduate level applications of research skills through intensive research and review, and we were each able to focus on our personal areas of interest. Personally, I was able to explore methods and practices used in the field of forensic anthropology, and to take a detailed look into trauma interpretation, pathological conditions and anomalies, forensic scene recovery, taphonomy, and methods used to estimate the postmortem interval. Towards the end of the semester, we were able to return to campus for a few days for in-person teamwork, cultivating and organizing the skeletal collection for the Department of Geography and Anthropology. Throughout the semester, I gained valuable insight into methods and applications relevant to my field of interest, experience compiling and succinctly annotating articles, and an understanding of team research. This knowledge proved to be exceedingly valuable for my current and future academic endeavors, and subsequently, for my career aspirations. – Schneider

Moving online during the COVID-19 pandemic was definitely a challenge, and with a different group of people it would have posed an issue. Fortunately, everyone involved with our project were the kind of people who could make sure they got their part done with just a few Microsoft Team meetings or reaching out for help if needed in the team chat. The occasional guest appearance of everyone’s pets was just an added bonus. The subject field was wide enough that all of us were able to choose specific topics within the field of forensics. For instance, I don’t have much interest in the medico-legal side of the field and don’t plan on going into the law enforcement field, but I have interest in ancient cultures and grave retrievals so I chose topics relevant to identification of sex, ancestry, and age in skeletons, personal identification, and comingling issues. Unfortunately, unlike the others in my group, I was unable to make it to campus for any extra in-person projects. Regardless, I was still able to gain valuable experience and knowledge working at a graduate level through collecting the necessary studies and annotating them. This experience will be incredibly important moving forward with attending graduate school and later, a career in the field of anthropology. – Hobbs

Spring Semester Presentations!

This May our senior Internship and Research Practicum students presented their amazing work to a panel of faculty and peers. From private companies to non-profits, our interns developed a range of skills in contemporary work places and put their anthropological knowledge to good use. Congratulations to those who scored a paying job as a result of their internship!

Our research students explored biological and cultural variation while testing basic and applied scientific questions. Congratulations to our seniors who have been accepted to graduate school programs in the fall! Check out our department Facebook page for all the updates: https://www.facebook.com/KSUGeoAnth

Zooarchaeology on Display

Christie Eades

This semester I had to opportunity to create a comparative collection of animal bones for Investigators and students to study. This involved collecting animals remains and processing them to be able to see the anatomical and morphological differences between human bone and non-human. Another aspect of the project was collecting animal bones from local butcher shops to show what domesticated animal bones look like compared to other native wildlife species.

During the Spring of 2019 over 700 animal bones were analyzed, collected and cataloged. I created an Excel spreadsheet of the species of animals I collected along with number of bones and type. Animal bones in the collection featured: American Black Bear, Armadillo, Beaver, Bobcat, Cougar, Cow Coyote, Domestic Cat, Domestic Dog, domestic Ferret, Domestic Pig, Eastern Cottontail Rabbit, Easter Gray Squirrel, Grey, Fox, Horse, Raccoon, Red Wolf, Striped Skunk, Virginia Opossum, White Tailed Deer, and Wild Juvenile Boar.

Another aspect of the project was creating a display case of animal skulls to show the differences between cranial and dental features along with how it changes along species.  Finally, I took photos of comparing the morphological differences of the animals listed above compared to human. The photos were compiled into a manual that compared each bone to human. The manual can be used in the field or even classroom setting to identify animal vs. human bone.